Services:

The Vision Screening Program screens more than 669,000 pre-school and school-age children in Michigan each year.

More than 70,000 referrals are made to eye doctors annually.

Vision Screening:

Includes testing for visual acuity, eye muscle function, nearsightedness, farsightedness, and symptoms of other eyesight problems.

Conducted at least once between the ages of 3 and 5 for preschoolers, and grades 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9, or in conjunction with driver training classes.

Vision Screening

Vision screening of pre-school children is conducted by local health department staff at least once between the ages of 3 and 5 years, and school-age children are screened in grades 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9, or in conjunction with driver training classes.

Many children enter school with vision problems. Children usually do not know that they see differently. Early identification of an eye problem is important. Conditions like amblyopia, or lazy eye, can be prevented if detected and treated during pre-school years.

"The Most Important Thing About First Grade... You Get Your Eyes Checked" Mason was so impacted be his big brother needing glasses (through the health department vision screening as his elementary school) he wrote this essay. Linda, mother of Logan (third grade) and Mason (first grade), from Coopersville, Michigan. The important thing about first grade is you get your eyes checked. You also learn to read and make new friends. You might have a great teacher like Sirbelink. But the important thing about first grade is you get your eyes checked.

FREE Vision Screenings at Your Local Health Department

All county or district health departments have a Vision Screening Program which includes initial screening, retesting, and referral of children. Vision screening of pre-school and school-age children includes tests for clearness of vision, eye muscle balance, nearsightedness, farsightedness, and symptoms of eyesight problems using screening and testing procedures approved by the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH).  The tests used to screen pre-school and school-age children aid in identifying children who may have vision problems that require additional evaluation and follow-up.

A referral is made to an eye care professional after a child has failed one or more of the battery of vision screening tests. Follow-up for all referrals is conducted helping to assure that care is received. Completed follow-up is reported to MDCH. At least ten percent of the children screened in Michigan are referred annually to an eye care professional.

Screening is available to all children in Michigan without cost, and screenings are conducted in public, private, and charter schools as well as during health department-based clinics. 

Of all children screened in Michigan annually, the Michigan Vision Screening Test Battery routinely identifies 10-15% of those screened as needing eye care.

Only a licensed optometrist or ophthalmologist can diagnose visual conditions.

Vision Screening Battery (PDF)

Michigan's Hearing and Vision Law
http://legislature.mi.gov/doc.aspx?mcl-368-1978-9-93

Vision Forms:
Vision Training Request Form for Health Departments
Michigan's Public Health Hearing & Vision Screening Program:
Vision Screening Order Form,  DCH-0504
Quarterly Report Batch Sheet,  DCH-0605
Kindergarten Entry/Preschool Hearing/Vision Screening Record  DCH-0479 

Vision Program Consultant:
Rachel Schumann, Ph.D., RN
schumannr@michigan.gov
517-335-6596